The Making of Walter Morrison: Family, Wealth, Education, Travel, Radicalism and Public Service

When

Fri, 19 November 2021. 7:30pm at Giggleswick School Memorial Library

Description

Explore the life and times of Walter Morrison in this lecture series featuring academics, archivists and architects.

“In his fifties, Walter Morrison wrote to a nephew: ‘Life which is all beer and skittles … is deadly dull work to the Northerner, especially to a Morrison, all of us more or less morbid. I found this out before I was your age [22] and got into business, and I suppose I should be wretched now if I had no hard work and anxiety.’ This talk will explore the influences that shaped the private and public life of Walter Morrison, with a particular focus on his family, his upbringing at Fonthill House, Basildon Park and London, his education and his inherited wealth.”

This lecture, by Dr Caroline Dakers, Professor Emerita of Cultural History, University of the Arts London, investigates what made Morrison the man he became.

The lecture will be held as a hybrid event: both in-person and online via zoom. In-person and online tickets need to be booked separately. You are on the in-person event.

The in-person venue is the Memorial Library at Giggleswick School. Capacity will be limited to ensure social distancing. If it is not possible to hold the event in person, all in-person attendees will be sent the link to the online event.

We are aware that there were sound issues with the opening lecture in the Morrison series. We will take steps to remedy this before the autumn series.

Access requirements

Due to the historical nature of the building, the venue is not wheelchair accessible and is accessed via a flight of stairs up one story. There is a toilet on site, but it is also not accessible. The event will be livestreamed for anyone who is unable to access the venue.

We will be taking steps to dampen the echo which made our previous online lecture difficult to hear for some listeners.

How do I find the venue?

Further info

Cost: £5/£7

Book

This event is part of Walter Morrison Festival